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Archive for March, 2021

Naida thought these maybe great opportunities to get some education credits. If you can not attend the live Zoom, they will be recorded later:

Emerald Ash Borer University (EABU) – Upcoming Spring Sessions

Authors Amy Stone

Published on March 11, 2021

Emerald Ash Borer

Changing EAB rules, oak wilt, invasive species management, and more! This spring’s EABU webinar series will cover a wide range of topics and see the start of a new series of 30-min All You Need to Know videos! Join us Thursdays at 11:00 AM ET starting March 18th. Details below!  

All webinars will be recorded. You can sign up to watch the live webinars or be notified when the recordings are posted by clicking on the links below for each of the sessions. Please feel free to share this announcement with anyone you think might be interested! All sessions are virtual and brought to you at no cost, as a result of continued support from the USDA Forest Service. 

CEUs will be available (CCH, ISA, SAF…) for the live webinar! Contact barne175@purdue.edu for more details. 

Registration for all talks: http://www.emeraldashborer.info/eabu.php 

Spring 2021 EABU Speaker List 

Title: Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Deregulation and Continuation of APHIS EAB Biological Control Program 

Speaker: Herb Bolton, National Policy Manager for Emerald Ash Borer, APHIS 

Date: March 18th, 11:00 AM ET 

Registration: https://msu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_PJ84xj44Q-GR09LEjenijQ 

Abstract: This webinar will cover the recent federal domestic deregulation of emerald ash borer (EAB). Herb Bolton will discuss what regulatory actions the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has ended since deregulation, and the continuation of the APHIS EAB program for biological control, EAB IPM and biological control research, and communication and outreach to the public on firewood. Ben Slager will give an overview of the APHIS EAB biological control program, the status of the program nationally, and how states and other partners can get involved in the release and recovery of the EAB parasitoids. 

Title: The economics of area-wide ash surveillance, treatment, and removal strategies to slow the spread of emerald ash borer in urban forests 

Speaker: Robert G. Haight, USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, St. Paul, MN 

Date: April 1st, 11:00 AM ET 

Registration: https://msu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_zwjPZKMXSPSS6VkH6PC9zQ 

Abstract: The emerald ash borer (EAB) is one of the most economically and environmentally damaging invasive species ever to reach the United States.  Economic damage of EAB is most severe in cities that lose abundant high-value ash trees growing along streets and in yards. Pest management and economic models suggest that an area-wide approach across all ownerships, including surveillance for early detection, treatment of ash trees with systemic insecticides, and removal of infested ash trees, yields the greatest benefits at the lowest costs. In this talk, Bob Haight will present research on the economics of area-wide strategies in Minneapolis/Saint Paul metropolitan region, the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba, and the state of New Jersey.  The key findings for resource managers are:

  1. Surveillance for early detection of infested trees pays off.  Waiting to apply surveillance and management risks the buildup of the EAB population causing more damage and economic loss. 
  2. Once surveillance identifies infested trees, cost-effective actions include treating newly infested trees and removing highly infested trees.  If the budget is limited, treating newly infested trees is the priority.    
  3. For risk averse managers who want to minimize the risk of overwhelming ash mortality, the cost-effective strategy is to monitor and remove ash trees in the vicinity of infestations.   
  4. Cooperation among city governments and private landowners can increase benefits for all.   

 
Title: MTE Oak Wilt Management and Control
Speaker: Tommy Stueck III, Forest Health Forester, Menominee Tribal Enterprises
Date: April 8th, 11:00 AM ET
Registration: https://msu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_jPkVS9tmSnmko9ZEdhNt1A
Abstract: Oak wilt is a deadly disease of oaks found throughout the Midwest and into the South. The speaker will cover: Northern Pin Oak Management vs Northern Red Oak Management, Surveying Techniques, Pocket Marking Technique, Oak Wilt ID, Bruhn’s Root Graft Model, Types of Treatments, and Success Rates. 

Title: Detecting and Monitoring Invasive and Non-Native Species from NEON Pitfall Traps
Speaker: Michael D. Weiser, University of Oklahoma   
Date: April 22nd, 11:00 AM ET
Registration: https://msu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_xEFAr6N0TQilRa5NToHDmQ 
Abstract: NEON (the National Ecological Observatory Network) uses pitfall traps to collect ground beetles (Carabidae) at 47 sites across the continental USA, Hawaii, Alaska, and Puerto Rico.  NEON technicians remove these beetles and retain all other pitfall organisms as “Invertebrate Bycatch.”  Using a combination of next-generation metagenomic sequencing and high-resolution digital imaging we have developed processes to non-destructively sample and identify taxa from the ethanol storage media.  We are able to use these data to detect and monitor range expansions in some non-native species.
 
Title: Gypsy moth: Everything you need to know in half an hour
Speaker: Cliff Sadof, Elizabeth Barnes of Purdue University, Department of Entomology, and Carrie Tauscher of Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry
Date: April 28th, 11:00 AM ET
Registration:  https://msu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_EjBdXKugQWOZil8Ws23U5A
Abstract: When does gypsy moth kill trees? When don’t you have to worry? Learn the latest in key information about gypsy moth including: management, current distribution, preventing spread, basic biology, host-plant identification, and more!
 

Title: Spotted lanternfly: Everything you need to know in half an hour
Speaker: Cliff Sadof, Elizabeth Barnes of Purdue University, Department of Entomology, and Carrie Tauscher of Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry
Date: April 29th, 11:00 AM ET
Registration: https://msu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Xa1oJU34QkSl3TNr-cmQOg
Abstract: Spotted lanternfly is a destructive pest that impacts over 70 species of plants. Learn the latest information about this pest including: current distribution, management, monitoring, basic biology, host-plant identification, and more!  
 

Title: Emerald ash borer: Everything you need to know in half an hour
Speaker: Cliff Sadof, Elizabeth Barnes of Purdue University, Department of Entomology, and Carrie Tauscher of Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry
Date: May 5th, 11:00 AM ET
Registration: Coming soon 
Abstract: Emerald ash borer is widespread across the Midwest but ash trees can be protected from it. Once those trees die, they become extremely dangerous. Learn the latest information on: management, managing EAB-killed trees, biocontrol programs, basic biology, host-plant identification, and more! 
 

Title: Asian longhorned beetle: Everything you need to know in half an hour
Speaker: Cliff Sadof, Elizabeth Barnes of Purdue University, Department of Entomology, and Carrie Tauscher of Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry
Date: May 6th, 11:00 AM ET
Registration: Coming soon
Abstract: Asian longhorned beetle is a death sentence to the trees it infests. Learn the latest on: current distribution, monitoring, basic biology, host-plant identification, and more!
 

Title: Thousand cankers disease: Everything you need to know in half an hour
Speaker: Cliff Sadof, Elizabeth Barnes of Purdue University, Department of Entomology, and Carrie Tauscher of Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry
Date: May 12th, 11:00 AM ET 
Registration: Coming soon 
Abstract: Should you be concerned about this disease of walnut trees? Learn the latest about thousand cankers disease including: distribution, management, monitoring, basic biology, host-plant identification, and more! 
 

Title: Hemlock woolly adelgid: Everything you need to know in half an hour 
Speaker: Cliff Sadof, Elizabeth Barnes of Purdue University, Department of Entomology, and Carrie Tauscher of Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry 
Date: May 13th, 11:00 AM ET
Registration: Coming soon 
Abstract: Hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) is a deadly pest of hemlock trees. Learn the latest about HWA: current distribution, biocontrol programs, management, monitoring, basic biology, host-plant identification, and more! 
 

More Information

Regional Emerald Ash Borer Website

http://www.emeraldashborer.info/

Word of the Week – Growing Degree Days (GDD)

Authors Amy Stone

Published on March 10, 2021

Common Lilac, Syringa vulgaris 'Charles Joly'

Growing Degree Days (GDD) are a measurement of the growth and development of plants and insects during the growing season. Development does not occur at this time unless the temperature is above a minimum threshold value, or what is also referred to as the base temperature. This base temperature can vary for different organisms and is determined through research and experimentation.

The actual temperature experienced by an organism is influenced by several factors and these factors will ultimately affect that organisms growth and development. We can probably all agree that depending on the weather, an organism’s temperature may be a few degrees more or less than that recorded. For example, an organism in direct sunlight will likely experience higher temperatures, than those in full shade, and of course somewhere in the middle if the organism is located in dabbled shade, or both sun and shade at some point throughout the day. What is comes down to is the actual location can result in those temperature differences. 

Fertility and nutrient levels in the soil can also affect the growth rate of insects and plants. The presence of weeds and precipitation may indirectly influence development as well. Due to these factors and some other scientific considerations, a base temperature of 50 degrees Fahrenheit is considered acceptable for all plants and insects, and what is used on the Ohio website.

GDD is a tool that should be in each green industry professional’s “tool-box”, and can be beneficial for consumers too. In Ohio, we are very lucky to have a GDD website that was developed as a result of work that Daniel Herms, Denise Ellsworth, Ashley Kulhanek and other contributors including Ohio Master Gardener Volunteers over the years. Check out the website for more information: https://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/gdd/

Growing
              Degree Day and Plant Phenology Website

The website uses GDD that ultimately provides a biological calendar that ‘marries’ a list of plants at their first and full bloom, and insect activity. This calendar is a sequence of events that includes both plants and insects and ties to each organisms to the GDD. 

It is important to say that while the actual number associated with GDD is based on weather stations across Ohio, there can be some differences based on microclimates, but the sequence of activity is always in the same order. As you use GDD, it is always recommended to get outdoors and compare what the website is telling you what should be happening, and what you are seeing. For example, the first plant on the Ohio list is first bloom of silver maple at  34 GDD. Check out the website, type in your Ohio zip code, see what the website says your GDD is, and then head out to the field and make the seasonal observations that is included in the list. Are you seeing silver maples blooming in your area?      

More Information

Growing Degree Days in Ohio

https://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/gdd/

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION

Where trade names are used, no discrimination is intended and no endorsement by Ohio State University Extension is implied. Although every attempt is made to produce information that is complete, timely, and accurate, the pesticide user bears responsibility of consulting the pesticide label and adhering to those directions.

Ohio State University Extension embraces human diversity and is committed to ensuring that all research and related educational programs are available to clientele on a nondiscriminatory basis without regard to race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, disability, or veteran status. This statement is in accordance with United States Civil Rights Laws and the USDA.

CFAES provides research and related educational programs to clientele on a nondiscriminatory basis. For more information: [ http://go.osu.edu/cfaesdiversity ]. 

Any materials in this newsletter may be reproduced for educational purposes providing the source is credited.

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Event Summary for Michigan State University Hidden Lake Gardens 2021 Bulb Show | ANR Events Management System (msu.edu)

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